JOEY RAMONE WITH DIE TOTEN HOSEN: BLITZKRIEG BOP SONG ON ALBUM AND EP


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INDEX:
1) LEARNING ENGLISH, LESSON ONE ALBUM (1991).
2) THE NIGHTMARE CONTINUES EP (1991).
3) SOME QUOTES FROM MY INTERVIEWS WITH DIE TOTEN HOSEN.

LEARNING ENGLISH, LESSON ONE ALBUM (1991)

Die Toten Hosen is founded in 1982 and group is one of the most famous German rock bands.
Die Toten Hosen recorded a cover album Learning English, Lesson One and they asked their idols/friends from legendary bands to do guest appearance with them. First song on this album is Blitzkrieg Bop, Joey Ramone does vocals. This cover album also features example Captain Sensible (Damned), Knox (Vibrators), Charlie Harper (UK Subs), TV Smith (Adverts) and Cheetah Chrome. Also contain one of the last recordings featuring Johnny Thunders before his death (Born To Lose). Blitzkrieg Bop appears as well in their Nightmare Continues EP.

TRACK LISTING:
1) Learning English, Step One performed by Die Toten Hosen
2) Blitzkrieg Bop with Joey Ramone
3) Brickfield Nights with Matt Dangerfield
4) No One Is Innocent with Ronnie Biggs
5) New Guitar In Town with Honest John Plain
6) If The Kids Are United with Jimmy Pursey
7) Nasty Nasty with Nick Cash
8) Dirty Pictures with Andy Ellison
9) Baby Baby with Knox
10) Gary Gilmore's Eyes with TV Smith
11) Diary Of A Lover performed by DTH With Matt & John
12) Born To Lose with Johnny Thunders and Cheetah Chrome
13) Do You Remember with Martin "Mitchel" Rockafella
14) Carnival In Rio (Punk Was) with Ronald Biggs
15) Richmond with Arturo Bassick
16) Whole Wide World with Eric Wreckless
17) Smash It Up with Captain Sensible
18) Stranglehold with Charlie Harper
19) Love And A Molotov Cocktail with Neil O'Connor
20) Do Anything You Wanna Do with Graeme Douglas
21) Goodbye from Janet & John with Die Toten Hosen



THE NIGHTMARE CONTINUES EP (1991)

TRACK LISTING:
1) Do Anything You Wanna Do with Graeme Douglas
2) Blitzkrieg Bop with Joey Ramone
3) If The Kids Are United with Jimmy Pursey
4) Baby Baby with Knox




Die Toten Hosen's quotes from my two first books...
"I've never seen anything like the Ramones show on that night, and I'm afraid it will stay an unreached moment for the rest of my life."


I wanna write a bit of my meetings and interviews with Die Toten Hosen. You can read here and here of meeting that happened in 2009 when CJ Ramone, Daniel Rey and Brant Björk played as a opening band for DTH.

First I met with the Die Toten Hosen members at the Nummirock festival in Kauhajoki, Finland in June 1997. Ramones played in my home city in that festival in 1992 and 1994.
My first book Heaven Needed A Lead Singer: Fans Remember Joey Ramone, has text written by DTH's singer Campino. One month after book was released in 2002, their managers Danielle Brillen and Patrick Orth organized a meeting with them for me at Himos festival in Finland. Apprecited, great and famous Finnish book writer and Ramones fan Leena Lehtolainen experienced then also cool meeting with DTH. At Himos DTH played Ramones song The KKK Took My Baby Away and dedicated it to Joey, Dee Dee and me. Dee Dee had passed only some weeks earlier...

That day at Himos festival I did interviews with Campino, guitarist Breiti and drummer Vom to my second book Rock In Peace: Dee Dee And Joey Ramone. Vom joined band in early 1990's. You can read from my book of recordings Vom (Stephen Ritchie) did with Stiv Bator, Johnny Thunders and Dee Dee Ramone. Those songs were released as Stiv Bator: Last Race CD.

Blitzkrieg Bop appeared on the Die Toten Hosen's Learning English, Lesson One album as well in their Nightmare Continues EP. On the Die Toten Hosen version of Blitzkrieg Bop, the lead vocals were sung by Joey Ramone. Here are few things what Campino, Vom and Breiti tells in my books:

Campino: "When I gave the Learning English - Lesson One gold record to Joey, I think it was his first golden record. They got (first Ramones gold record) it of Ramones Mania later."
Campino: "The most incredible night I ever shared with Joey and the Ramones happened in Buenos Aires, Argentina. We were supporting their "Goodbye to South-America" show in 1996 and the whole River Plate Stadium was filled with 50 000 kids of the "Ramones army", all dressed in black. I swear to God, there was not one of them who wasn't wearing a Ramones T-shirt. I've never seen anything like the Ramones show on that night, and I'm afraid it will stay an unreached moment for the rest of my life."

Vom: "Early nineties, that was when I first met him. With Joey I was just really nervous, but he came in and he was there, so I started speaking to him. I said: "I used to be in Doctor And The Medics.", he just went "cool cool." Cos I mean, Joey's two of me and it was a really funny situation. To see Joey bent in half talking to me like that and I'm like this, you know?"
Vom: "I did a lot of talking on the phone with Dee Dee, four or five times, before I met him. We did The Stiv Bator album in Paris. He was always trying to put up a tough front, but underneath you knew he was a nice guy."

Breiti: "Ramones set new standards, especially at this time, when in the seventies the songs got longer and longer and guitar solos got longer and longer and the distance between the fans and the bands got bigger and bigger. They brought it back to zero and just what is most important in music, playing good songs one after the other. What was amazing to see or hear how they could squeeze 30 songs as a whole set in such a short amount of time. From other bands took three hours for that."